madamemodiste: (Default)
So I've decided that since I don't have a spencer jacket pattern (and don't feel confident yet to scale up the one from Hunnisett's book), I'll use the Butterick B4890 robe pattern. I might re-draft the front to look more like Marianne's picnic robe from the '95 S&S.

So, what fabric to use? The gown is white stripe, so I can do anything, really. I've decided I want to make it fun and unexpected. A black and white stripe? A black and white diamond pattern? Can you tell I'm inspired by Mondo?

*edit*
Ugh, never mind. I can't find any cool fabric in my budget. Something plain it is.
madamemodiste: (Default)
Well, after over a year, I have picked up the Regency dress project again. Here is where it is now. It just needs a skirt and sleeve hem and it's done.
If memory serves, I think I used a combination of patterns from Sense and Sensibility as I wanted a flatter front on the skirt and the drawstring top, but I forget the details.

I hate how square the shoulders look on the dress form. Man, I hope it doesn't look like that on me!



madamemodiste: (Default)
Yesterday I got the cartridge pleating done - successfully. Then today I got the cartridge pleated overskirt sewn to the waistband of the underskirt - successfully. Ugh, finally I got something right!

YAY!!

So next is sewing down the bodice and sleeve trim, hem the sleeves, hem the skirts, and it's done.

DONE.
madamemodiste: (Default)
Well, looks like the pleating tape didn't work out for me. I had to cut off a ton of the overskirt because it turned out way too big at the waistline. Now I'm going to try hand pleating.
madamemodiste: (Default)
As I'm a lazy, non-period accurate costumer, I was happy to take some advice regarding cartridge pleating the overskirt on my Elizabethan. Decorator's pleating tape! It doesn't give as clean a result as hand cartridge pleating, but I have a feeling it saved me some time (which I have very little left to finish this thing). So here's a shot of the dress in it's current state. I'm still fiddling with the trim.



The overskirt obviously isn't sewn to the underskirt yet, but it's an idea of how things will look in the end.
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I want to apologize for the lack of progress photos. By the time I take photos, upload them to the computer, adjust the size and color, then upload them to the server so I can post them online...a half hour has gone by. These days I need every minute I can get!

Anyway...next time I plant to make something large in velvet, please point to this series of posts, and say, "For the love of sewing, Kat, don't do it!" I just don't have a knack for working with the stuff.


In Which I Botch It All Up:

OK, so last we left off I had gotten the sleeves made and set. Good. Next...overskirt! So I cut all this out weeks ago, so I pull the pieces back out and get to work. Oh -I may or may not have posted about how I somehow cut the front pieces so the nap was not going in the same direction for both? Yeah, I had to cut a new right front piece. OK, done. So now I have to sew this small triangle piece to the front at the lower CB to make it a square. Not sure why they don't have you cut it that way to begin with, but that's a complaint for another day. So I put them in, and the next step is to sew the fronts to the backs. Except I forgot about the back pieces. Like...*poof* I stupidly sewed the two fronts together. I didn't realize until I got to the cartridge pleating instructions and it said to cut a piece of gingham 122" long. 122"?? My overskirt isn't 122"! Then I vaguely remembered cutting out two large pieces of velvet 48 3/4" x 43 1/4" several weeks ago...then the image of me going, "Wow, look at this large piece of velvet. What's this doing here? Huh, well, I'll use it to cut out the sleeve poufs!" Then I cut two left poufs instead of a right and a left and had to cut another one. Yeah, I accidentally used one of the back panels to do the sleeve poufs.

*sigh*

So I cut new back panels and TRY to get them so the nap matches the front pieces, but I was only successful on the right side. At this point, I don't care anymore and go to bed.

Next: cartridge pleating *OR* In Which Kat Loses Her Mind
madamemodiste: (Default)
The other week I got the other half of the bodice made, and put in the two piece grommets. Yay!

School once again takes up most of my time, but I got a teeny bit done this week. I sewed on the hooks and eyes on the front of the bodice (28 in all). That took forever! Then last night I found more of the black cotton velvet lurking in my stash and was able to re-cut the right overskirt panel, so now both sides nap are going in the same direction. I then got the green "lower" sleeve cut out before I was summoned by Mr. S to go watch Dexter.

So much left to do and only two weeks to do it! I'd really better get a lot done tonight because tomorrow is the Germantown Revolutionary War festival (and the only day we're expecting sunshine this week or next! All other days it's rained/expected to rain) as well as one of my best friend's birthdays. I'm really excited to play 18th century with [livejournal.com profile] blackcat452 and [livejournal.com profile] past_blue! I even went out and got a new long length 3/4 wig so I can pretend I have long hair so I can style it like I used to.

I really got inspired by a dress I saw in a book titled "Black in Fashion" that I saw at the Met over the summer. Didn't have the cash to pick it up, sadly. It's a book that follows the popularity of black clothing for whatever occasion in the modern age (I think it starts with the 19th century). Anyway, it's got me itching to get back to sewing for the Victorian era.

So that's it for now!
madamemodiste: (Default)
So I decided to make the Simplicity 8881 back lacing and closing in the front with hidden hooks and eyes so I can actually get into it myself. I also had to take an inch and 3/8 off of each of the CB of the back pieces because the finished product ended up being much larger than stated on the pattern. Since I'd already boned the inter layer, it was easier to just take the extra off the CB and move those boning channels over. Might not be the most correct way to do it, but it worked.

SO!

Once that was done, I put together the left side of the bodice, and then the right side of the bodice. Then I did the same with the fashion fabric. Then I laid the fashion fabric (velvet) right sides together with the boned interlining and stitched 5/8" seam along the bottom, up the CF, and along the neckline. I left the CB open so I could turn it right side out. Then I clipped the seam allowance and turned it all right side out.

Voila!

madamemodiste: (Default)
So...what about changing out the silver braid trim and using black instead?

photo under here...tired of taking up your friend's page!) )

Plain?

Aug. 31st, 2010 09:42 am
madamemodiste: (Default)
Ok, ok...here it is without the guards and just the silver trim.

Yay or nay?

trim

Aug. 31st, 2010 09:01 am
madamemodiste: (Default)
OK, so what if I gave the guards more depth and added a strip of black velvet over the guards and under the silver trim? (I used some scrap ribbon in this case as a test)



This trim is a silver and black mix, so when I pair it with straight silver trim, it looks garish. I love the idea of framing the guards in the trim, but I don't think I have enough.
madamemodiste: (Default)
So the underskirt is done except for waistband and hem. The pattern calls for me to move on to the overskirt. I'm using black cotton velvet and I made two "skirt guards" out of the forepart fabric. They are 5" wide and have antique silver braid trim running down the middle.

The trim is just pinned, so I can make some changes. What do you think? I made the guards 5" because that is how wide the facing is, and the fabric's pattern is large and I wanted to display a little of it. I don't have enough of the green to make a border around the hem of the skirt.

To tack it down, what would you do? I'm a fan of using the machine for as much as possible, but I'm thinking that to use it to tack down the guards would look shitty. The dreaded fabric glue? Eeensy weensy hidden stitches in matching green thread? I plan to use invisible thread to do the silver trim...could I use that in the machine to do the guards, too, or would you see it anyway?

madamemodiste: (Default)
So I've begun the new Ren gown. I got out my Simplicity 8881 that I used 10 years ago only to find that the only piece that is cut out is the over skirt.

? o_O ?

I'm wracking my brain trying to figure out how that is possible. I made the dress. I'm looking at it right now. How is only the overskirt cut out of the pattern? I was just learning to sew then. Did the girl helping me loan me her pattern, and later I bought my own? There are no tracing marks on the pattern, so I didn't trace it. I have no memory of it! And here I thought I'd be one step ahead because I thought the pattern was already cut out! LOL!

One trick that girl taught me was instead of inserting boning, cut a sheet of plastic canvas to the shape of the front of your bodice and flatline it to your interlining to get that stiff, conical shape that was popular. I think something more period correct would be to use buckram or serious padding, but I am trying to use stuff in the stash and am not concerned with being period correct in this instance.

OK, I'm off to cut out fabric now! Wish me luck!

[edit] Ahh! The plot thickens! There are two copies of one of the pages of directions in the pattern bag. This proves there was once another copy of this pattern! I wonder what happened to it?
madamemodiste: (Default)
So I've decided to make a new Ren dress this year out of stash fabric. I've had the same two for over 10 years and they are looking rather bedraggled. On the other hand, I'm glad I can still fit into them! Anyway, I recently acquired 3 yards of a pretty green cotton brocade with lions and crowns.

Wanna see the fabric? )
madamemodiste: (Default)
I've become a huge fan of Edwardianera.tumblr.com recently, and she recently posted 2 great turn of the century hair tutorials:



And here's another that incorporates fun old-timey hair doodads like "rats"!

http://zipzipinkspot.blogspot.com/2009/08/hairstyle-tutorial-1909-coiffure.html
madamemodiste: (Default)
I was invited to attend a local museum exhibit as "atmosphere" in a Victorian dress. It was so much fun! I wore my new Lost Souls dress (so named because it's all black and sucks up all the light and is hard to photograph).

Here are a few photos taken by Steven Rosen Photography (all rights reserved!!!)



a few more here )
madamemodiste: (Default)
OK, Everyone! I need your help! I have entered three of my dresses into an online dress contest. Would you check it out and possibly vote for me if you like my dresses?

My gowns are:

Entry 28 (white and pink NF era day dress)
~this is up for 2 categories "best day dress" and "most beautiful dress overall"

Entry 49 (Crawford Manor dress- cream and purple stripe)
~this steampunk day dress is up for "best day dress" and "best alternate steampunk neo Victorian or gothic bustle dress"

Entry 56 (Lost Souls day/reception dress)
~this Victorian gothic day gown is up for "best day dress" and "best alternate steampunk neo Victorian or gothic bustle dress"

Check it out here: http://www.bustledress.com/cgi-bin/z.pl/reset/room73.html (scroll all the way down)

To vote, Beginning July 1st, 2010- August 7th, 2010 Submit your vote for your favorite Bustle Gown(s) one per category, 1X per day, per person, per email address at: lisa@bustledress.com

So...feel free to vote for me on three separate days!!

(please remember to follow the voting rules or your vote will be disqualified and THANK YOU!!!)
madamemodiste: (Default)
Whew! It's done!



MORE PHOTOS HERE )
madamemodiste: (Default)
madamemodiste: (Default)
So I wasn't able to say much about the summer Victorian gown project until the party was over, but now I can post about it.

I became enraptured with a white gown that Tissot painted several times. Then I saw this fashion plate that was very like the Tissot gown, but fancier. Perfect!! It's definitely much girlier than what I usually make.

Beth had many yards of a white stripe cotton gauze she gave me for the project. The gown was made from Truly Victorian patterns. The overgown is the Tea gown pattern...modified. It's flatlined in pink cotton. The gauze skirt is the fan skirt (without the fan or train) and the pink cotton underskirt is the tie back skirt.



...and here I am wearing it )

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